What Happened to my State?

Not a single state of the United States survived the 21st Century intact. Local divisions, famines, natural disasters and wars all lead to massive upheavals and population drops. City-states began to re-emerge at the end of the 22nd Century, with nation states and empires following shortly thereafter.

States in Italics are not part of Atlantic America; their histories haven’t been worked out yet.

Alabama

  • Dissolution
  • Rise of the City States
  • The Mississippi Empire
  • The Commonwealth Era

Alaska

Arizona

Arkansas

  • Dissolution
  • Successor Prophets
  • The Mississippi Empire

California

Colorado

Connecticut

  • Dissolution
  • Piracy
  • Stability
  • The Commonwealth

Delaware

Being close to Washington, DC, Delaware was heavily influenced by the chaos surrounding the nation’s capital during the fall of the previous nation-states. The population migrations out of the urban areas did not wash over Delaware as it did other states, but the famines that swept the nation were just as brutal.

The City States that grew in the 22nd and 23rd centuries fought each other over the resources of their peninsula, banding together only to fight off raiders from the dead cities or pirates off the Atlantic. Even as trade and technology brought sustainability, the city-states remained fiercely independent of each other.

The Delaware cities joined the Lexington Organization early on, sending troops and small ships to join the war effort against the Commonwealth. Occupied by Imperial troops, Delaware is currently a part of the Atlantic Dominion and under direct control of the Commonwealth.

Florida

  • Dissolution
  • Caribbean Naval Powers
  • The United Kingdom of Caribbean States
  • The Commonwealth

Georgia

  • Dissolution
  • Hegemony
  • Mississippi Empire
  • The Commonwealth

Hawaii

Idaho

Illinois

  • The horrors of Chicago
  • Other State Influences
  • Divided up

Indiana

  • Dissolution
  • The Warlords
  • Between the powers
  • The Commonwealth

Iowa

  • Dissolution
  • The Church
  • The Confederacy
  • The Commonwealth

Kansas

  • Dissolution
  • The Dakotas

Kentucky

  • Dissolution
  • City States
  • Mountain Raiders
  • Confederacy
  • Commonwealth

Louisiana

  • Dissolution
  • Two Kingdoms
  • Mississippi empire
  • The Commonwealth

Maine

  • Dissolution
  • Quebecois Influence
  • The Commonwealth

Maryland

  • Dissolution
  • The Naval State
  • City-States
  • The Commonwealth

Massachusetts

  • Boston
  • Anti-Piracy
  • Stabilization
  • The Commonwealth War
  • How did they survive?

Michigan

  • Dissolution
  • The Sailing Guild
  • The Republic of Michigan
  • Detroit
  • The Commonwealth

Minnesota

The Iron Republic of Minnesota.

The state of Minnesota survived for a few years as an independent nation before falling. Several successor city-states arose, who fought for domination. The state was eventually unified under the Iron Republic of Minnesota. The Iron Republic fell during the Commonwealth War and is now part of the Kingdom of North Mississippi.

Mississippi

  • Dissoultion
  • The Mississippi Empire
  • REbellions
  • The Commonwealth

Missouri

  • Dissolution
  • Pirate Kings
  • The Purge
  • The Mississippi Empire
  • The Commonwealth

Montana

Nebraska

  • Dissolution
  • The Dakotas

Nevada

New Hampshire

  • Dissolution
  • Bandit Lords
  • The Quebecois Flood

New Jersey

  • Dissolution
  • Complete Choas
  • The Archive
  • The City States
  • The Commonwealth

New Mexico

New York

  • The Scourge
  • City Warfare
  • Influence of other Powers
  • City States
  • The Commonwealth

North Carolina

  • Dissolution
  • City States
  • The Triad War
  • The Commonwealth

North Dakota

The strong military presence in North Dakota during the end of the United States led to a short-lived military government. Commanded by a senior general, this government attempted to bring order to the region, but was too caught up in the chaos. They picked fights with other immediate successor governments (including the Independent State of Minnesota). Suffering from supply shortages and hemorrhaging personnel who wanted to go home to protect their families, the government did not survive the 21st Century.

As the vast plains developed into the Dakota Territory, the survivors of North Dakota struggled. Many started the nomadic lifestyle that continued to this day. Small family-sized plantations grew and died with regularity. Some settlements around abandoned or mostly abandoned cities managed to eke out an existence raiding the urban centers for supplies.

By the 23rd Century the situation had stabilized, and communities no longer were in danger of disappearing. Food production grew. As did trade of recycled resources and technology. Settlements along the Red River Valley became part of the Red River Valley Dominion and eventually the Iron Republic of Minnesota.

On the plains, most settlements remained small. Two expectations were Bismarck and Minot, both of which became proper city-states. However, the distance between settlements has kept aggressive expansion in check; the city-states serve as centers of trade and transportation, not expansion. It was a joint venture between Minnesota and Bismarck that led to the first functioning railway into the state in three centuries.

The Commonwealth War had little impact on the Dakota Plains. Small trade missions were established in Minor and Bismarck, but the Commonwealth considered the entire Plain to be an Unorganized Territory and largely leaves them alone.

Ohio

The first new communities in Ohio existed along the lake and river fronts, where irrigation and transit was possible. Slowly new communities forged their way into the interior of the state, absorbing or displacing the communities of the upper hills.

In the 23rd century, the dead area around the ruins of Columbus showed signs of life. Surveyors and scavengers moved in, unearthing many old treasures. The influx caused a decade of strife, as some communities and city-states attempted to use such artifacts for their own ends.

By the time of the War of the Three Fools (2371-2377), Ohio was divided into nineteen city-states or rural communes, with some of the northwest areas controlled by the People’s Republic of Michigan. During the war, the communities of Ohio founded the United Cities of the Ohio Valley, including cities in other former states, fighting off intrusions from both Michigan and Quebec.  Originally dependent on the Empire of the Mississippi for resources and weapons, the UVOC did not become the puppet state the Emperor wanted.

The UCOV joined the Lexington Organization and fought against the Commonwealth, and lost. Northern Ohio was annexed by Michigan, while southern Ohio became part of the new Kingdom of the Ohio, under the younger brother of the Emperor.

Oklahoma

  • Dissoultion
  • The Native Nation
  • Mississippi
  • Commonwealth

Oregon

Pennsylvania

  • Dissoultion
  • Pennsylvania Princes
  • Encroachment
  • UVOC
  • Commonwealth

Rhode Island

  • Dissolution
  • The Cult of Fire
  • Cleansing
  • The Commonwealth

South Carolina

  • Dissolution
  • The Pirate Princes
  • Stability
  • The Commonwealth

South Dakota

  • Dissolution
  • Dakota Plains

Tennessee

  • Dissolution
  • River Kings versus Mountain Lords
  • UCOV and Mississippi
  • Commonwealth

Texas

With the fall of the United States, Texas attempted to revert back to an independent nation, but too many factions had different ideas of what that meant. Various Texan nations lasted almost to the end of the century.

Over the 22nd Century, communities and city-states began to reform. Texas became the land of a hundred flags. Over the decades these flags coalesced into various minor kingdoms as communities conquered or absorbed one another. Much of this had to do with the Santiago family, a family that provided several rulers and important politicians across the former state.

The Santiago family eventually merged with the Locke family of the Mississippi empire. The marriage of the two families provided Mississippi with troops and a source of food, and provided the Texas kingdoms with political and military protection. Texas finally stabilized into a dozen kingdoms.

After the Commonwealth War, the various Texan kingdoms were subjected to serious restrictions and punitive taxes. The kingdoms report directly to the Margrave of Houston, the former Emperor of the Mississippi, who so far has shown little favoritism towards his distant cousins on their thrones.

Utah

Vermont

  • Dissolution
  • Quebecois Scourge
  • The Commonwealth

Virginia

  • The Naval State
  • Peace
  • Commonwealth

Washington

West Virginia

West Virginia saw some of the worst fighting and atrocities of the fall of civilization: the death of technology brought about a rise in the importance of coal. Warlords took hold and imposed chattel slavery on the population, turning the whole state into a wasteland.

Eventually even the need for coal failed, leaving a handful of heavily militarized communities outnumbered by their slaves. This lasted barely two generations before military forces out of the Ohio Valley moved in, eventually liberating the population.

The state remains an exceedingly rural region, with most of the population living in self-isolated communities, avoiding the world at large. A few city-states became part of the UCOV. After the Commonwealth War, the territory falls under the rule of the Kingdom of Ohio.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin fell apart early, swarmed by refugees fleeing Chicago. As local infrastructure failed, the city of Madison fortified itself, becoming a lone pillar of order in the chaos of the time. Madison eventually became one of the first Archives.

Many communities along the coast of Lake Michigan became part of the Sailing Guild, which developed into the People’s Republic of Michigan. Communities further inland retained their independence, forming an array of hundreds of city-states and protected communities, ranging from as small as one hundred souls to twenty-thousand. Some became involved in the various wars that raged across Minnesota in the 23rd century.

This array of independent communities survived with little more than rough skirmishing, broken up by the occasional warlord or progressive movement. In most cases, there was an entrenched belief of ‘live and let live’ between various communities. Should one warlord or movement get too large, coalitions would form and defeat them, then dissolve.

After the War of the Three Fools, the People’s Republic of Michigan turned its eye towards Wisconsin, hoping to regain some of the pride it had lost. The nation began annexing communities, sometimes very violently. The state became more conflicted as the Iron Republic of Minnesota began funneling weapons and supplies into Wisconsin. Michigan’s advance slowed, and occupation of the territory became costly.

Wisconsin remained torn until the end of the Commonwealth War, when a coup in Michigan installed a king and ended their democratic government. Wisconsin was ceded to Michigan completely, an annexation enforced by two Imperial Commonwealth Corps that marched across the land, leaving the communities behind weakened and bloody.

As of the present, Wisconsin is an occupied land.  The eastern cities, long a part of the Republic of Michigan, long for their lost democracy. The western communities, newly occupied, yearn for their independence. The only exception is the Madison Archive, which retains its independence as part of the Archive Network.

Wyoming